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Saturday, December 5th, 2020

Tetra Pak research study reveals a clear convergence of environment and health issues, creating new opportunities for the F&B industry

56% consumers think purchase choices they make for their personal health have an impact on the environment; 63% think that environmental issues have an impact on their health.

INVC NEWS 

New Delhi,

Tetra Pak today reveals the findings from a global research study in partnership with Ipsos on the two most pressing consumer demands: the environment and health. They have historically been seen, and communicated, as separate areas: however they are increasingly converging, creating pivotal opportunities for food and beverage brands in how they market their products over the next 12 months.

 

With two thirds of consumers now believing that we are reaching an environmental tipping point, consumers overwhelmingly see themselves as being directly responsible for the world around them, and for their own health. With environmental issues becoming more evident in daily life, our concerns about the impact on our health are also growing. Nearly 60% of consumers globally now believe that their health and well-being are strongly affected by environmental problems.

 

As one of the only industries that can connect the environment at a personal level to the individual, by also talking about health, F&B  brands have an opportunity to drive change through the way they communicate with their consumers on these topics, to meet this growing and pressing need.

 

To support brands with navigating this journey, the Tetra Pak Index 2019 reveals six new segments of consumers, each with their own attitutes around both health and the environment - Active ambassadors, Planet friends, Health-conscious, Followers, Laggards and Sceptics.

 

Saumya Tyagi, Director Marketing – Tetra Pak South Asia, said: “Through this study we’ve tried to understand the convergence of two important trends- Health and Environment. The study identifies six consumer segments that have different drivers and barriers and trust different sources for information. The implication is that a tailored approach is needed to communicate with the different consumer groups. While some seek fact-based information from scientists, others rely on input from friends and social media. Ultimately, each group presents clear opportunities for targeted products and messaging for food and beverage brands.”

 

Consumer segments:

 

Active ambassadors: high engagement in all aspects of health and environment, willing to take action, challenge boundaries and influence others.

Look to fact-based sources such as scientists and academics, as well as NGOs for advice on the environment.

Planet friends: willing to take action about the environment with  high engagement on most aspects of health, but less inclined to challenge boundaries.

Engaged and willing to take action about the environment. High engagement also on most aspects of health, especially for peace of mind.

Health conscious: aware and engaged about the environment, but prioritise health over the planet. Prepared to pay more and sacrifice convenience for healthy products.

Depend heavily on social media and other online sources.

Followers: engaged enough with health and environmental issues to feel guilty about both, but not inclined to change behaviour or try new things.

Sizeable mainstream cohort with interesting potential, want to know more and be persuaded and energised to act. Look to TV/radio more than the average.

Laggards: lack of knowledge and interest in all aspects of health and the environment. Sceptical about technology and change.

Look to their own personal, real world networks, particularly towards friends and family.

Sceptics: Aware of environmental issues, but inclined to decline them as “fake news”; “traditional” views on food and health.

One in five Sceptics say they don’t take advice on the environment from any media channel.

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